Archive for the Hockey Category

Nice Piece on MBSC Client Mike Grier at the Select 17’s

Posted in Hockey, MBSC News, Media, Training, Uncategorized, Youth Training with tags on July 9, 2014 by mboyle1959

Former long time MBSC client Mike Grier is coaching at the Select 17 camp.

Take a peek

Grier Grooms Next Generation at the Select 17’s

Keeping the Horse in Front of the Cart

Posted in Hockey, Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Media, Random Thoughts, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Youth Training on June 29, 2014 by mboyle1959

A friend saw this slide from Functional Strength Coach 5 putting the cart before the horse
on a Twitter feed and asked me to explain. Putting the cart before the horse is literally an analogy for putting things in the wrong order. If we can view methods ( Olympic lifting, plyometrics, etc.) as the cart and safety as the horse we must see that safety trumps methods. We must consider safety as we consider methods. Many coaches use a one-size-fits-all type of approach and this is in my mind putting the cart in front of the horse. As we develop a program we must first consider the audience. What I might consider safe for an eighteen year old collegiate athlete might be risky for a soccer mom. What I consider safe the eighteen year old hockey player might be risky for the 30 year old veteran. Methods can vary based on the audience. If we place methods first ( i.e everyone does Olympic lifts regardless of age or experience) than we place the cart in front of the horse. The key to good training is keep the horse in front of the cart. The audience determines the method. Does that help?

Have You Seen Functional Strength Coach 5?

Posted in Core training, Hockey, Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Media, Seminars, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags , , on June 27, 2014 by mboyle1959

Every once in a while it pays to ask. Have you seen Functional Strength Coach 5? Take a look at what one of our former MBSC Mentorship attendees had to say about Functional Strength Coach 5.

In an information age that can easily confuse and overload (as well as break the bank of) the less experienced coach/trainer, Functional Strength Coach 5 is 7 hours of information that will simplify the process. It will put the less experienced on a path of Mike Boyle’s philosophies that have proven to be successful on every level. You will find yourself saying “this stuff finally makes sense” and gain more confidence in your abilities to train others. Even though I have studied and implemented Mike’s system for 13 years, I found many more tweaks that will make my coaching better. I also found myself motivated to “stay the course” and realize good fundamental philosophies should always be the backbone of any good program. Thanks Mike for sharing so much priceless information in Functional Strength Coach 5. Sean Ross, Ross Strength and Speed

If you are interested you can go to Functional Strength Coach 5 to order.

Another Vote Against Dump and Chase

Posted in Hockey, Random Thoughts, Training, Youth Training with tags on May 30, 2014 by mboyle1959

Here’s another case against the old “dump it in” mentality. The saddest part of this is that we have coaches in squirts encouraging kids to dump the puck in.

Why the Death of Dump and Chase is Imminent

http://www.thescore.com/news/496440

Functional Strength Coach 5

Posted in Core training, Hockey, Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Media, Seminars, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags , , , on May 9, 2014 by mboyle1959

Just a reminder ( in case you missed the 500 emails from my friends and colleagues) that Functional Strength Coach 5 is out. Who knows, maybe you were out of the country the last few weeks.

Functional Strength Coach 5

Gaining Exposure or Being Exposed?

Posted in Guest Authors, Hockey, Training, Training Females, Uncategorized, Youth Training with tags on May 4, 2014 by mboyle1959

As a parent, I’m living this right now. Do you train to get better or, do you try to get “seen”.

Even limiting summer hockey to 2-3 tournaments can be tough. If you “must”, pick 2-3 that work with a good training schedule. Summer time is training time. If you really want to improve you need at least 10 weeks of good quality strength and conditioning in the summer.

Gaining Exposure or, Being Exposed

http://www.admkids.com/news_article/show/377168?referrer_id=940598

Just Because You Volunteer Doesn’t Mean You Have Any Less Responsibility

Posted in Guest Authors, Hockey, Training, Uncategorized, Youth Training with tags , on April 24, 2014 by mboyle1959

Great piece from my good friend Anthony Donskov

I write this article as a Coach, not as a niche strength and conditioning professional, but as a Coach. The word Coach has tremendous meaning and implication regardless of sport or activity, paid or unpaid. We are life changers! We have the ability to instill values, create work ethic, and provide a positive culture for young men and women. Ask any middle aged person and chances are some of the most important and influential people in their lives have been coaches. This is a responsibility, and with great responsibility comes accountability! Regardless if you are a paid professional or a volunteer, you have the ability to change lives! Just because you volunteer doesn’t mean you have any less responsibility!

Most (not all) volunteer coaches have their children actively participating in the respective sport/activity. I’m sure everyone’s heart is in the right place, but consider, youth coaching has a profound impact on overall athletic development. Here’s how:

Motor patterns are groomed
Neuro-muscular patterns are set
Habits (good or bad) are ingrained
EXPERIENCES are remembered! Did the kids have FUN?
coach22

I have witnessed youth hockey practices where young children spend 40 minutes of a 50-minute practice standing in line waiting for drills. Is this fun? Is this organized? Are kids developing? Full field youth soccer scrimmages where athletes never touch the ball. I have also seen 90-minute youth football practices where coaches are talking systems without developing any type of skill set (running, catching, throwing, changing direction). It’s great that young Tommy knows the fly right, catch 22 pattern, but he can’t run OR catch the ball so how the hell is he going to get there? Below are three things that need to be considered before you volunteer as a coach.

Make the Choice: I have tremendous respect for anyone who volunteers his/her time. Everyone has a schedule to keep and volunteer coaches are no different. Time is a huge factor. Having a full time job and family make it difficult to plan and organize practice. If your not organized, your players will take notice. Make the choice to be organized! Whether that’s learning from an experienced coach, stealing practice plans (there are great practice resources all over the internet), or going to a few lectures. This IMPACTS the environment and aids in development! Make the choice! You have a responsibility to do so! You’re a COACH!

Keep Moving: When in doubt, keep kids moving. Jumping, running, throwing, catching, skating, stick handling, shooting, passing are all fundamental movements/skills that must be mastered before any system work commences. It’s also FUN! I call this camouflage work. Kids are having so much fun they don’t even know their working.

FUN: Kids want to have fun! Waiting in line isn’t fun, nor is a 2-1-2 fore-check system for a nine year old or playing soccer without touching the ball. Divide the field/ice. Allow kids to play small area games with the ball/puck. This promotes fast decision-making, running, skating, passing, stick handling, teamwork; ball/puck touches and is a ton of FUN!

Being a Coach is an honor and privilege. It holds more validity than we may ever know to the young men and women that we come in contact with. Just because you’re not getting paid doesn’t mean this doesn’t apply to you. Make the choice, keep moving and have Fun! In twenty years you may have changed more lives than you possibly could have imagined. This is worth more than money can buy!

Anthony Donskov, MS, CSCS, PES, is a former collegiate and professional hockey player, founder of Donskov Strength and Conditioning Inc., (www.donskovsc.com) and Head Instructor/Director of Off-Ice Strength and Conditioning for Donskov Hockey Development (www.donskovhockey.com). He can be reached at info@donskovsc.com .

A Misinformed Road To Success

Posted in Guest Authors, Hockey, MBSC News, Media, Training, Training Females, Uncategorized, Youth Training with tags , on April 11, 2014 by mboyle1959

From David Conte – Executive Vice President, Hockey Operations/ Director, Scouting. Entering 30th season with NJ Devils, 21st as team’s Director of Scouting NJ Devils, Stanley Cup 1995, 2000 & 2002.

Dave Conti – To Parents and Players

Parents and players are more interested in playing for rewards and for recognition rather than for pure joy.

When you do this, this limits chances of advancements, the very thing that parents and players seem to want,

they are precluded by a misinformed road map.

It is self-indulgent, all of this pursuit to go to Quebec to be in the supposed top tournament. What about citizenship? What about responsibility? The emphasis on winning results in players who are over-zealous and (unnaturally) aggressive. This emphasis deters skill development and enjoyment.

It starts at a young age; the play is too physical. Kids want to play with their friends and enjoy it for what it is. Look at kids in a skate board park.. There are no adults telling them what to do or evaluating them. They are uninhibited, inventive, just like when I was a kid playing pond hockey or street hockey.

We need more people with a love of the game.

Genetics play a big part in skill, but you see it evaporate in kids. Kids you see, who have ability when they are young, 8,10, 12 years of age, then it’s not there at 14 or 15. Why are kids leaving the sport at 14 or 15? There is too much emphasis on trophies.

These summer exposure tournaments are a big waste of time.

If you play in the summer it should be for fun. You have these people who run these things telling parents and players that if you do not participate that you will not gain recognition.

I will find you!

I do not go to these things. They are a waste.

People are too worried about status and jackets.

You need to do challenging drills,… that is how you get better.

Young players are lacking because too many people are telling them what to do and how to play, because of this they don’t think.

You don’t need exposure, you need to get better”.

The Slow Death of Dump and Chase Hockey

Posted in Guest Authors, Hockey, MBSC News, Media, Random Thoughts, Seminars, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags , on April 10, 2014 by mboyle1959

This is another great read for youth hockey coaches and youth hockey parent from the legendary Jack Blatherwick.

The best analogy in all these articles is to imagine a basketball coach screaming “pass it to the other team and defend”. How silly does that sound? That’s hockey coaching at the U-10 level some days?

If you really want your kid to be good:

1- play 1/2 ice early and often.

2- find a coach who doesn’t care about winning

3- find a coach passionate about offense who will tolerate mistakes

I have a friend in an NHL front office who said “we only draft offensive players. We can make offensive players into defensive players with good coaching in the minors but we can never make defensive players into offensive players”.

http://www.getsportiq.com/2013/11/the-slow-death-of-dump-and-chase-hockey/

 

Hockey Parents PLEASE Read This.

Posted in Guest Authors, Hockey, Random Thoughts, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags , on April 9, 2014 by mboyle1959

I can’t tell you how many times I have the “1/2 ice conversation” with parents. Parents just don’t get it. One of the big complaints in town hockey is lack of ice time but tell some frustrated NHL-coach- wanna-be that he has half a sheet and he rolls his eyes.

PLEASE take a minute and read this. The bottom line is that everyone who actually knows anything about hockey development favors 1/2 ice practice, 1/2 ice games and small games. If you don’t, ask yourself why?

Think Small for Big Gains in Learning Hockey

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/sports/hockey/edmonton-oilers/jason+gregor+think+small+gains+learning/8974755/story.html

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