Archive for the Hockey Category

Who Should You Take Advice From?

Posted in Hockey, Injuries, MBSC News, Strength Coach Podcast, Updates, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags on November 21, 2015 by mboyle1959

I wrote this piece for my site a few months ago and thought I’d share it with a wider audience.

Brian Carrol wrote an interesting piece called Five Reasons Your Not Getting Stronger. It was pretty good and to the point.

I thought I’d analyze this part though:

Qualify the person you’re taking advice from using these 5 questions I learned from Dave Tate of Elite FTS:

1. What is his/her education and background?
2. How is/was this coach’s performance in the particular sport they’re coaching?
3. Who have they trained?
4. Have they been able to make athletes better than they were before training with them?
5. Do they practice what they preach?

If I score myself, I do pretty good on number 1- Education and background.

2. Performance in the particular sport they are coaching? I was not very good at anything. In fact, my best sport was swimming. I played and liked lots of other stuff ( powerlifting, basketball, football) but, performance? Not so much. Surprisingly, I have a baseball worlds series ring ( played from 8 years old to 12 and stunk) and two ice hockey national championship rings ( never played). By the way, my dad won a few state championships as a basketball coach and never played organized basketball. Also, in most team sports, great players don’t make great coaches. In strength and conditioning most of the best coaches I know either weren’t very good, had a career shortened by injury or both.

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How Strong is Strong?

Posted in Hockey, Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Strength Coach Podcast, Updates, Training, Training Females, Youth Training on October 23, 2015 by mboyle1959

This is one of my favorite articles…

It’s interesting, ask a strength coach what a good bench press is for a 200 lb male and chances are you’ll get a good answer. Maybe everyone won’t be in agreement but, everyone will have an opinion. Ask a good strength coach what constitutes good single leg strength or good vertical pulling strength and I don’t think you’ll get the same level of agreement or, if everyone will even have an answer. The answer might even be something like “what do you mean?” Last spring and summer I set out to answer both questions. How much single leg strength and upper back strength are actually possible? I think if you are going to train, you need a goal. If we are going to train for strength, we need to know what strong is. The four-minute mile is a great example. In 1957 Roger Bannister broke the four-minute mile. On that day he broke a twelve year old record. By the end of 1957 sixteen runners had also broken the four-minute mile. It’s amazing what someone will do once they have seen that it is possible. Twelve years to break the record and sixteen followers in one year. My goal is to raise the bar on both single leg strength and upper back strength by telling the strength and conditioning world how strong strong might be….

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A Saturday at Automobile University

Posted in Hockey, Injuries, MBSC News, Strength Coach Podcast, Updates, Training with tags , , on October 18, 2015 by mboyle1959

I drove five hours from Boston to Syracuse New York to watch my daughter play hockey yesterday and got smarter in the process. I listened to Episode 172 of The StrengthCoach Podcast with Sean Skahan and Chris Chase  and the latest episode of Ron McKeefery’s Iron Game Chalk Talk with Ed Cosner. Time flies when you’re getting smarter.

Great Piece on Developing Athleticism

Posted in Guest Authors, Hockey, Updates, Training, Training Females, Youth Training on July 25, 2015 by mboyle1959

Here’s another great article for parents and youth hockey coaches on developing athleticism.

7 Tips to Developing Athleticism

Development vs Winning

Posted in Guest Authors, Hockey, Media, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags on July 14, 2015 by mboyle1959

This piece could just as easy be hockey as soccer.

Development vs Winning

However in hockey you can even eliminate the one pass and just let your best player go end to end and get you goals.

However, as the game progresses you continually find kids who don’t know how to play hockey.

Think about this quote. I asked my squirt aged son ( age 10) whether he liked cross ice or full ice. His typical response FULL ICE. I asked why. His answer MORE BREAKAWAYS!

This is analogous to me asking him if he likes ice cream or salad. We know the answer. Just remember, it’s not about what a kid likes ( or a parent) it’s about what’s good for them.

We are the adults, we get to choose. When we choose winning at the young ages we actually program for failure later.

Lessons From Martin St. Louis

Posted in Guest Authors, Hockey, Training, Youth Training with tags , on July 11, 2015 by mboyle1959

This article came from John O’Sullivan of Changing the Game Project. I had the pleasure to meet Martin St. Louis and think his story inspires everyone but, particularly those told they were too small, too slow or, too something else to make it.

Can You Gain Mass With Split Squats?

Posted in Hockey, Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Strength Coach Podcast, Updates, Training, Uncategorized with tags on July 1, 2015 by mboyle1959

Got this question yesterday?

Q- With using split squats, RFE split squats, etc. instead of back squat or any bilateral lifts besides deadlift; can
you still put on mass successfully?

A- The answer to the question would be “why not”. Do you think the body knows how many legs it on?

One idea that is thrown around is that heavy weights produce an anabolic effect. Although this may be true, I don’t think there is any evidence that the heavy load needs to be applied bilaterally? Do you really think your hormones say “I’ll hold off here, he’s only using one leg”?

Also, hypertrophy in response to high volume bodyweight work can be seen in a number of examples. Distance runners tend to have unusually large calves. Speed skaters and cyclists tend to have large quads. Any female athlete that jumps or sprints tends to have great glute development.

The reality is that heavy loads are not a requirement for hypertrophy and, that light loads might actually work just as well.

In any case I don’t think the body knows whether each leg squatted 150 lbs or, both legs squatted 300. In fact, if we look at bilateral deficit, the average weight per limb might be heavier.



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