Archive for the Strength Coach Podcast Category

Should You Overhead Press

Posted in Injuries, MBSC News, Media, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Uncategorized, Youth Training with tags on July 23, 2014 by mboyle1959

Take a look at this short clip I filmed for Stack Magazine and Stack.com on overhead pressing. Should you? Where do you start? Click the link.

http://www.stack.com/video/3651831063001/page-title

Great Advice on Running Shoes

Posted in Guest Authors, Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Media, Random Thoughts, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females with tags on July 1, 2014 by mboyle1959

Did you know that one study shows that the more you pay for running shoes the MORE likely you are to get injured?

Here’s some great advice on running shoes from Max Prokopy of the UVA Speed Clinic ( also a former MBSC intern).

5 Running Shoe Myths Debunked

Have You Seen Functional Strength Coach 5?

Posted in Core training, Hockey, Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Media, Seminars, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags , , on June 27, 2014 by mboyle1959

Every once in a while it pays to ask. Have you seen Functional Strength Coach 5? Take a look at what one of our former MBSC Mentorship attendees had to say about Functional Strength Coach 5.

In an information age that can easily confuse and overload (as well as break the bank of) the less experienced coach/trainer, Functional Strength Coach 5 is 7 hours of information that will simplify the process. It will put the less experienced on a path of Mike Boyle’s philosophies that have proven to be successful on every level. You will find yourself saying “this stuff finally makes sense” and gain more confidence in your abilities to train others. Even though I have studied and implemented Mike’s system for 13 years, I found many more tweaks that will make my coaching better. I also found myself motivated to “stay the course” and realize good fundamental philosophies should always be the backbone of any good program. Thanks Mike for sharing so much priceless information in Functional Strength Coach 5. Sean Ross, Ross Strength and Speed

If you are interested you can go to Functional Strength Coach 5 to order.

The MBSC Internship Experience 2014

Posted in Guest Authors, MBSC News, Seminars, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags on June 24, 2014 by mboyle1959

Daniel Breen is a young Irish strength and conditioning coach interning at Mike Boyle Strength and Conditioning. He writes about his experiences over the past two weeks here

Another Must Read For Parents!

Posted in Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Media, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags , , on June 18, 2014 by mboyle1959

Please read this regardless of what sport your child plays.

Two big takeaways:

1- Kids of rich parents get hurt MORE! ( socio-ecomonic status was a predictor of injury risk but, probably not like you think)
2- Elite athletes specialized later than their sub-elite counterparts! So many great pros were multi-sport athletes. We had two Red Sox pitchers last year who did not pitch until they signed major league contracts. One was a Junior College Quarterback and first baseman ( now an elite pitcher), one played college basketball in addition to baseball.

Sports Should be Childs Play

Building Strength Without Muscle Mass?

Posted in MBSC News, Random Thoughts, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Uncategorized, Youth Training on June 17, 2014 by mboyle1959

Got this question from a reader?

“I coach Cross Country and Wrestling athletes. They want to get stronger but do not want to
build lots of mass. I have read a variety of opinions from only body weight to
low rep/high weight to high rep/low weight”

I submitted a version of this to PTontheNet in 2005 and also published similar thoughts on my StrengthCoach.com site.

In order to effectively and honestly develop training programs it is important to revisit what we know or more importantly, what we think we know, about the development of hypertrophy. I must confess that I’m not a hypertrophy expert. I discovered this information mostly by accident. I train primarily athletes and generally don’t worry about hypertrophy to any great degree. I began to question what I had always taken for granted about hypertrophy. Recently I’ve begun to look at some of the accepted ideas about training in general, and about hypertrophy in particular, that many of us in the fields of strength and conditioning and personal training seem to accept as factual. Lets take a look at some of these myths about hypertrophy:

1) Do bodyweight exercises to avoid hypertrophy?

Lets ask ourselves a simple question. Do muscles have the capability to recognize type of resistance? Can a muscle tell the difference between a weight, a band or a spring? How about a dumbbell or the weight of the human body? I don’t believe so. One of my favorite lines of bull is the old “ this exercise or training method will give you long, lean muscles like a dancer”. This is akin to telling people you can turn an apple into an orange right before their eyes. You can no more make a short stocky female client have long lean muscles like a dancer than you make someone taller. Exercise will remove subcutaneous bodyfat and reduce intramuscular fat stores but, changing the source of resistance in a resistance-based exercise will not produce a muscle that appears different and or larger. Muscles can’t tell the difference between resistance generated by a piece of iron, your own bodyweight or by a piece of rubber. Weights can be hard, bodyweight can be hard, bands can be hard.

If weight training had to be done with a free weight to produce hypertrophy then lat pulldowns would be a better exercise than chinups for upper back development. Thousands of bodybuilding articles tell us the opposite but, the resistance in a chin-up is “only” bodyweight. If we don’t want hypertrophy than don’t do light weights and more reps. I think the common prescription to avoid hypertrophy ( light weights, lots of reps) leans more towards a bodybuilding, mass producing prescription than away from it. If I wanted less hypertrophy, I would stay in the 5-6 rep range with higher loads and less sets. Bottom line, you can produce hypertrophy with weights or without.

3) Lift light weights and do more reps?

Light weight is an oxymoron. Why would anyone lift light weights? I often talk to trainees, particularly females who say something like “ I have 8 pound dumbbells and I do the same routine three times a week”. When I ask them how long they have been doing this they often say, “The last two years”. My response is, “Wow, by my estimation you’ve wasted about 100 weeks of training”. Usually their response is, “I don’t want to get too big”. This is one of my favorites. Ask a natural bodybuilder how much time and effort goes into gaining ten pounds of muscle. Most male natural bodybuilders will tell you that it takes about a year to gain ten pounds of quality muscle. For a female this could be two years. Isn’t it great that our 8 lb dumbbell waving female client is concerned about too much hypertrophy. I recently trained a golfer with the same concerns. He didn’t want to gain too much size. He thought it would hurt his swing. I had the same response to him that I do to most female clients, “Don’t worry about it”. Gaining size takes a lot of time and effort. It’s like someone saying “I don’t read, I don’t want to get too smart”.

The Truth About Hypertrophy

The fact of the matter is that hypertrophy may be the goal for some clients and considered an unwanted byproduct of training by others. In either case it should not be a great concern. The reality is that hypertrophy for most, non-anabolic using clients, is in fact hard to come by. An unfortunate problem with hypertrophy training is that our concept of how to train for hypertrophy has been heavily influenced by steroid users. If a client wants to weight train but has no desire for hypertrophy I would perform 5-6 reps per set. I would avoid the conventional three to four exercises per body-part favored by the bodybuilding crowd. I would perform one or two exercises for each movement pattern but, stay in the 5-6 rep range.

The public is uninformed and often as trainers we’re just playing along. We talk to clients about tone, and about changing muscle structure ( long dancers muscles). I just hope that people in the industry can see that this is salesmanship and not science. I have an idea. Why not tell our athletes and clients the truth? When your female client says “ I don’t want to get too big”, tell her the truth. Say, Don’t worry I’m not sure you’ll train hard enough to produce much muscle anyway. Your athletes are worried about getting too big? Tell them not worry about getting big because it takes a huge amount of work and great genetics.

Obesity- Cancer Link?

Posted in Fat Loss, Guest Authors, MBSC News, Nutrition, Random Thoughts, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females with tags on June 11, 2014 by mboyle1959

No matter how flimsy you might feel the link between cancer and obesity is, this is huge motivation to lose weight.

Cancer- Obesity Link?

I know I get criticized for a lot of the Mercola stuff but, I still believe Dr. Mercola makes us think.

Crossfit Sues the NSCA?

Posted in Media, Random Thoughts, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training with tags on June 3, 2014 by mboyle1959

Here is a great read. I think the funny part is that Crossfit’s view is that Crossfit and the NSCA are competitors ( read line 1 of #2 in the suit). Somehow the NSCA and the ACSM get lumped in together?

Crazy stuff

Crossfit sues the NSCA

Surviving Planes, Trains and Automobiles

Posted in Guest Authors, Injuries, Low Back Pain, Random Thoughts, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates with tags , , on May 29, 2014 by mboyle1959

I owe my friend Anderson Bourell for this one. Take a look at the image below. It’s a sock in a tennis ball. My friend Anderson had mentioned keeping a ball in my backpack and doing some self massage in the seat while traveling. This worked out awesome and I would recommend every try it. Just put a tennis ball in your backpack and stick it under a glute or hamstring. I know you are thinking “why the sock”? I one upped Anderson because my mid back was sore and I needed a way to position the ball.

If you coach, get every player a tennis ball and a sock for the next road trip and thank Anderson.

Sock_Tennis_Ball

Planes, Trains and Automobiles

Posted in MBSC News, Seminars, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training on May 28, 2014 by mboyle1959

Just got back from an amazing trip to China but, yesterday was the worst travel day of my life and I’ve done some crazy travel.

Left Shandong Province in China at 8:30 AM China time on Tue ( 8:30 PM Monday night in Boston if you want to keep track)
Drove 1 hour to the high speed train station
Took 1.5 hour high speed train ride to Beijing ( picture is fuzzy but thats 294 KPH)
2014-05-25 19.02.34

Drove 1 hour from Beijing train station to the Beijing Airport
Flew 13 hours to Detroit, departing at 4:50 PM China time ( over the Polar ice cap) Arrived at 5:40 EST, still Tue ( like getting in a time machine, you travel back in time).
Two hour layover in Detroit turned into 4.
Boarded flight from Detroit to Boston. Arrived at 11:20 PM EST.
Drove 30 minutes to home. Arrived at 12:10.
Elapsed time from start to finish, 27.5 hours.

It’s great to be home.

The plus side is I made some great friends. I want to thanks Tom, Sarah, Dr Liu, Dr Zhiang ( hope I spelled it right) and everyone else who made my trip so amazing.2014-05-26 19.20.12

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 23,754 other followers