Archive for the StrengthCoach.com Updates Category

Another Parental Must Read- A New Type of Cross Training for Kids

Posted in Guest Authors, Hockey, Injuries, Low Back Pain, Media, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags , on August 13, 2014 by mboyle1959

Read this piece from USA Hockey with a new take on Cross Training

Should Baseball Players do Crossfit?

Posted in Guest Authors, Injuries, Media, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags on August 11, 2014 by mboyle1959

Nice Stack Magazine piece from Tony Gentilcore looking at

Should Baseball Players Do Crossfit?

Crossfit’s Growth Fuels Safety Concerns

Posted in Guest Authors, Injuries, Low Back Pain, Media, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags on August 10, 2014 by mboyle1959

Nice piece from ESPN Magazine

Crossfit’s Growth Fuels Safety Concerns

Should You Overhead Press

Posted in Injuries, MBSC News, Media, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Uncategorized, Youth Training with tags on July 23, 2014 by mboyle1959

Take a look at this short clip I filmed for Stack Magazine and Stack.com on overhead pressing. Should you? Where do you start? Click the link.

http://www.stack.com/video/3651831063001/page-title

Strength and Conditioning for Swimmers

Posted in Injuries, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Uncategorized, Youth Training with tags on July 7, 2014 by mboyle1959

I received these email questions from a viewer of Functional Strength Coach 5

Here are the questions:

Q 1. Swimming does seem fundamentally different from other sports since we are not on land. I’m trying to figure out how that fact should influence the programming we do during our strength work on land. Swimming is a highly shoulder-driven, internally rotated activity. Keeping shoulders healthy is my primary concern. Do you have any suggestions beyond floor slides to warmup the shoulders and upper body?

My first thought came right from the first hour of the seminar “your sport is not as different as you think”.

This answer was written in a thread on my StrengthCoach.com site by site member Justin Levine

Think of it as “athlete specific” training not sports specific. OF course there are some specific things swimmers need to work on but get them to be a better athlete and they will be better in the pool.
Teach them how to roll and stretch as most youth athletes have no clue how to do this properly. Educate on proper warm-up strategies so they know what to do pre-swim meet. When it comes to the workout, teach basic jumping progressions focusing on landing mechanics first. This will enhance there starts and pushes off the wall. Add in shoulder stability and core stability as fillers. This will create a balance shoulder girdle and a strong core to transfer more force through the legs are arms. Get them “brilliant at the basics” (Thanks Dewey Nielsen author of Brilliant at the Basics) in terms of strength development. Master bodyweight movements first. Split squats, chin-ups, inverted rows, hip lifts, push-ups, planks, push-up walks. Remember to keep it simple because the basic movements will get these kids strong and stable.

The workout I just did with 3 swimmers looked like this:

Foam roll
Stretch
Mobility/Dynamic warm-up
Ladders drills

Power:
1a: Controlled squat jump and stick
1b: MB OH and chest slams
1c: Front Plank
1d: Y’s/T’s

Strength:
1a: Split squat
1b: Chin-ups
1c: Wall Slides

2a: Hip Lifts
2b: Push-ups
2c: Side Plank
And remember to COACH COACH AND COACH MORE!

Justin Levine
Owner, California Fitness Academy
http://www.livecfalife.com

Q 2. While leg power is important for swimmers (off the turn and start), it seems less so than for land athletes. Would you recommend a greater emphasis on upper body exercises for swimmers? Unilateral upper body movements for swimmers? I’m even thinking of a band-assisted single-arm pullup rather than a regular two-armed pull-up.

1/3 of the race is start and turn in short course so lower body strength and power are still important. I would not do unilateral bodyweight pulling like you mentioned. I think it could be dangerous.

Bottom line is that although swimming is obviously different, strength training for swimming is not. The same set of basic rules apply.

Great Advice on Running Shoes

Posted in Guest Authors, Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Media, Random Thoughts, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females with tags on July 1, 2014 by mboyle1959

Did you know that one study shows that the more you pay for running shoes the MORE likely you are to get injured?

Here’s some great advice on running shoes from Max Prokopy of the UVA Speed Clinic ( also a former MBSC intern).

5 Running Shoe Myths Debunked

Keeping the Horse in Front of the Cart

Posted in Hockey, Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Media, Random Thoughts, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Youth Training on June 29, 2014 by mboyle1959

A friend saw this slide from Functional Strength Coach 5 putting the cart before the horse
on a Twitter feed and asked me to explain. Putting the cart before the horse is literally an analogy for putting things in the wrong order. If we can view methods ( Olympic lifting, plyometrics, etc.) as the cart and safety as the horse we must see that safety trumps methods. We must consider safety as we consider methods. Many coaches use a one-size-fits-all type of approach and this is in my mind putting the cart in front of the horse. As we develop a program we must first consider the audience. What I might consider safe for an eighteen year old collegiate athlete might be risky for a soccer mom. What I consider safe the eighteen year old hockey player might be risky for the 30 year old veteran. Methods can vary based on the audience. If we place methods first ( i.e everyone does Olympic lifts regardless of age or experience) than we place the cart in front of the horse. The key to good training is keep the horse in front of the cart. The audience determines the method. Does that help?

Have You Seen Functional Strength Coach 5?

Posted in Core training, Hockey, Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Media, Seminars, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags , , on June 27, 2014 by mboyle1959

Every once in a while it pays to ask. Have you seen Functional Strength Coach 5? Take a look at what one of our former MBSC Mentorship attendees had to say about Functional Strength Coach 5.

In an information age that can easily confuse and overload (as well as break the bank of) the less experienced coach/trainer, Functional Strength Coach 5 is 7 hours of information that will simplify the process. It will put the less experienced on a path of Mike Boyle’s philosophies that have proven to be successful on every level. You will find yourself saying “this stuff finally makes sense” and gain more confidence in your abilities to train others. Even though I have studied and implemented Mike’s system for 13 years, I found many more tweaks that will make my coaching better. I also found myself motivated to “stay the course” and realize good fundamental philosophies should always be the backbone of any good program. Thanks Mike for sharing so much priceless information in Functional Strength Coach 5. Sean Ross, Ross Strength and Speed

If you are interested you can go to Functional Strength Coach 5 to order.

The MBSC Internship Experience 2014

Posted in Guest Authors, MBSC News, Seminars, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags on June 24, 2014 by mboyle1959

Daniel Breen is a young Irish strength and conditioning coach interning at Mike Boyle Strength and Conditioning. He writes about his experiences over the past two weeks here

Another Must Read For Parents!

Posted in Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Media, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags , , on June 18, 2014 by mboyle1959

Please read this regardless of what sport your child plays.

Two big takeaways:

1- Kids of rich parents get hurt MORE! ( socio-ecomonic status was a predictor of injury risk but, probably not like you think)
2- Elite athletes specialized later than their sub-elite counterparts! So many great pros were multi-sport athletes. We had two Red Sox pitchers last year who did not pitch until they signed major league contracts. One was a Junior College Quarterback and first baseman ( now an elite pitcher), one played college basketball in addition to baseball.

Sports Should be Childs Play

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 24,320 other followers