Archive for the Youth Training Category

Great Piece on Developing Athleticism

Posted in Guest Authors, Hockey, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Youth Training on July 25, 2015 by mboyle1959

Here’s another great article for parents and youth hockey coaches on developing athleticism.

7 Tips to Developing Athleticism

Development vs Winning

Posted in Guest Authors, Hockey, Media, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags on July 14, 2015 by mboyle1959

This piece could just as easy be hockey as soccer.

Development vs Winning

However in hockey you can even eliminate the one pass and just let your best player go end to end and get you goals.

However, as the game progresses you continually find kids who don’t know how to play hockey.

Think about this quote. I asked my squirt aged son ( age 10) whether he liked cross ice or full ice. His typical response FULL ICE. I asked why. His answer MORE BREAKAWAYS!

This is analogous to me asking him if he likes ice cream or salad. We know the answer. Just remember, it’s not about what a kid likes ( or a parent) it’s about what’s good for them.

We are the adults, we get to choose. When we choose winning at the young ages we actually program for failure later.

For All Youth Sports Parents- PLEASE READ

Posted in Guest Authors, Injuries, MBSC News, Media, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags on July 12, 2015 by mboyle1959

This is an absolute, must read,  classic. I see this every day in our town. You can’t buy athletic success but, you certainly can pay to get your children more screwed up. I have always told parents “follow the money”.

Early specialization is both a developmental and social mistake. Don’t get sucked in. The best preparation for young kids ( 8-13) is multi-sport participation. Save your money.

Elite at 10?

 

Lessons From Martin St. Louis

Posted in Guest Authors, Hockey, Training, Youth Training with tags , on July 11, 2015 by mboyle1959

This article came from John O’Sullivan of Changing the Game Project. I had the pleasure to meet Martin St. Louis and think his story inspires everyone but, particularly those told they were too small, too slow or, too something else to make it.

http://changingthegameproject.com/an-uncommon-man-life-lessons-from-a-true-sports-role-model/

MBSC Summer Program Starts Monday

Posted in Core training, Fat Loss, Hockey, Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Media, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags , on June 12, 2015 by mboyle1959

Our 18th summer program starts on Monday. It’s crazy how time flies. We still have a few spots available for late morning in both Woburn and North Andover.

PS- If you are still in school for another week you can come in the afternoon for a week or two if needed.

 

 

A Great Programming Question

Posted in MBSC News, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags , , on June 5, 2015 by mboyle1959

I received this via email yesterday and thought I’d share it. I’m in the process of writing a second edition of Functional Training for Sports ( my first book in 2004) and will clear stuff like this up…

Hey, Coach!- I’m designing my first strength program and had two questions for you:

Q 1) I am using your template for a 3-day strength program from Functional Training for Sports, and it calls for Double Leg Knee Dominant exercises on Day 1 and Day 3. I am much more in favor of single leg exercises, and there’s no shortage of Single Leg Knee Dominant exercises, so I wanted to know if substituting the double leg exercises for a Rear Foot Elevated Squat and a Split Stance Squat Progression would be okay? I remember reading that you were slowly progressing towards an ALL single leg training philosophy, but didn’t know if you had attempted it with any success yet. I am a track and field athlete, if that would make any difference in the matter.

A- We have not gone quite all the way yet with healthy athletes. Day 1 has Trap Bar Deadlift ( actually a hip dominant or hybrid) as our only bilateral strength exercise of the week.

Leading me into my second question…

Q 2) In your Advances in Functional Training, I recall you classifying Lunge-type exercises as Hip Dominant, although it can be confused with a Knee Dominant exercise very easily. If I were to use Lunge-type exercises as a Knee Dominant exercise in my program, would I risk under training a true Knee Movement, or would it not be an issue? (Didn’t quite know how to word that one )

A- Almost true. We would classify slideboard lunge as hip dominant but conventional lunges as knee dominant. I would not worry about being too hip dominant if you get Rear Foot Elevated One Leg Squats and true one leg squats once each.

Thoughts? Comments?

 

Coach James Leath on Playing Time

Posted in Guest Authors, Training, Training Females, Youth Training on May 26, 2015 by mboyle1959

This is a great piece. Please don’t credit me with writing it!

At times I have been accused of playing my favorites. Let me be very clear:

Yes, I do play my favorites.

Here is the reality. I am a youth coach. Before you stop reading let me also say I believe it is very important everyone plays in youth sports. But this is not the NBA and I do not have to play my best players in order to keep my job. A benefit of coaching youth sports is there is less pressure to win, and as a coach I can focus on player development without worrying about getting fired. Ask the average youth athlete why they play sports and I bet they would say because it’s fun. Maybe they will say because they get to hang out with friends. Maybe they like the coach. Rarely will they say it’s because they like to win.

If I have a win-less season as a 5th grade football coach and every athlete wants to play again the next year, was I successful? That actually happened to me. In 2013, we lost every game; we were defeated. And we made sure every player played in every game. Every Monday the whole team showed up ready for another week. At the end of the year party, I was brought to tears. I asked the team who was going to play the next year. Every single athlete raised his or her hand. I just happened to run into one of those athletes last weekend at his lacrosse game. (I am not coaching, but I hear a whistle and I cannot resist). You know what we didn’t talk about? Losing every game. I asked him what he remembered about the season and he said, “It was a lot of fun, and you let us play tag at the end of practice.” He thought it was fun. He played a lot and yes, he was one of my favorites. Keep in mind we lost every, single, game.

At the beginning of every season I hold a parent meeting where I present my goals for that season. They include character development, skill development, tons of encouragement to take chances and lots of high-fives. Notice: winning is not on that list. It doesn’t need to be. When you keep things simple and kids are learning and improving every week, winning is a by-product. And let’s not fool ourselves; the scoreboard at a youth game is for the parents and the coaches, not the athletes.

So yes, I play my favorites.

Here are six things I look for in an athlete to be on the starting roster:

Punctual:If a kid is late to youth practice, it’s the parents’ fault. Being a parent is tough and getting all their kids to practice on time is just not always possible. I’ll never punish a kid for being late to youth practice, as long as when they come in they jump right into the drills and get to work. However, if a high school kid is late to practice, it’s the athlete’s fault and that athlete is running.
Committed: I appreciate when an athlete is trying to juggle two sports, but most of the time it is unnecessary. When a player shows up to practice, I expect them to be ready to practice, not exhausted because they just got done with travel ball practice. When you commit to a team for a season, see it through. I do not believe a young athlete should specialize, a subject I have written about before here and here.
Adaptable: The game is on Saturday and I get a call Friday night that a kid got in trouble at school and they won’t be at the game the next day. Now I need someone to play a position they may have never played before. Being adaptable is an indispensable attribute for an athlete.
Aggressive: As a coach I do whatever I can to keep game assignments simple. I tell an athlete, “This is your position, and these are your two options. Pick one and go all out. If you pick the wrong one, it’s okay, just go all out.”
Growth Mindset: This TedTalk by Carol Dweck talks about how what someone believes about their ability to learn actually affects their ability to learn! She contrasts a growth mindset with a “fixed mindset” and proves that anyone can learn something new if only you believe you can and then work smart about it.
Confident: Confidence is something that builds over time. If my team is in week-three of basketball practice and my athlete is still afraid to shoot the ball, then we have a problem and we need to fix it. It’s okay, it’s youth sports and it will take time to build confidence. However, if the athlete is afraid to shoot the ball because her parents will be disappointed that she missed, then I have a problem with the parent and that is a whole other issue. Don’t mind me, I’ll be on the sideline ecstatic that she shot the ball regardless of the result. You know what that does? It shows her it’s okay to shoot and she will most likely shoot again. She is bound to make it eventually.
These are the attributes all coaches look for in an athlete. Ultimately they are developed or under-developed because of the parents. Teach your kids to have these six attributes by modeling them yourself. Remember, most kids do what they see us do, not what we tell them to do.

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Until next week…
James Leath
San Luis Obispo, Ca
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