Archive for January, 2009

Day In The Life- Addendum

Posted in Uncategorized on January 31, 2009 by mboyle1959

I received a lot of great feedback on my article this week on strengthcoach.com, A Day in the Life. However, I left out one huge point. 

The biggest thing I neglected to say was “surround yourself with good people”.

Without my wife and the people around me all the productivity ideas in the world would be wasted. I want to take a second and publicly thank my wife Cindy, my business partner at Mike Boyle Strength and Conditioning Bob Hanson, and my productivity team, Aaron Hardisty, Adrienne Norris and Anthony Renna. Without these guys I am simply the Wizard of OZ faking it behind the curtain. 

I’d also like to thank the staff at Mike Boyle Strength and Conditioning who do such a great job. I apologize for such a huge oversight.

Greatest Video Ever

Posted in Uncategorized on January 29, 2009 by mboyle1959

This is the essence of sport. It brought tears to my eyes. You may have seen it but, watch it again

A Day in the Life

Posted in Uncategorized on January 29, 2009 by mboyle1959

I hesitantly posted this piece on Monday on Strengthcoach.com. I thought it might be viewed as self-serving. However the response has been entirely positive so I thought I’d post it here also. 

A Day in the Life

I often get asked, “How do you get so much done with your business, coaching, writing, speaking etc”. 

I usually try to give a humble answer and mumble something about hard work etc. 

The truth is there is a method to the madness and I’d like to share some of the things that have increased my productivity: 

1- Get up early. Successful people don’t hit the snooze button. I remember one great tip about waking up. “When the alarm goes off, get your feet on the ground” I have lived by this for at least twenty years and now rarely need an alarm. Years ago I also read somewhere that you should get out of bed when you wake up instead of rolling over. The concept is related to sleep quality and I have found it to be true. Fifteen minutes of “extra” sleep usually leaves you more tired. If I wake up within 30 minutes of when I am supposed to wake up I “get my feet on the ground”. 

2- Many people remark that they get emails from me at 4:45. That is because I get up, go to my computer, and check my email. I read another hint once that said “if you can respond in under a minute, do it now”. I have adopted that policy as best I can and it has really helped. I can interact with 100 people a day and do most of it before my family gets out of bed. The nice thing is that getting up early also allows me to help my wife by throwing in a load of laundry and allows me to spend time with my children in the morning when they get up. 

3- Write everything down. I have a notebook with me at all times for article ideas, program ideas, notes and To Do Lists. It’s much too easy to forget. Never trust your memory. I also have a Palm Treo phone for day-to-day stuff. 

4- Don’t try to do paperwork at work. I know this sounds silly but I get no paperwork done at work. I try to coach at work. I work at home in the morning. Work before the rest of the world rises and you will get more done. 

5- Don’t go out to eat lunch. What a waste of time. Lunch hour is for “normal” people who don’t like their job and need an hour away. Those that want to succeed will never waste even a half hour sitting and eating. Lunch takes all of 5 minutes. Dinner is a different story. Dinner is family time. I bank my “lunch time” so I can use it at dinner when I have my family. Another benefit of this is that it helps with weight control. I can’t seem to go into a sandwich shop and not walk out with a bag of chips. Often I have eaten them before I get my sandwich. Keep shakes on hand and eat every three hours while you work.

6- Use commuting time. I often spend two hours a day in the car. Often, I will make all my phone calls for the day in the car and, record my podcast interviews with Anthony Renna (www.strengthcoachpodcast.com) from my car. The police may not like this but it is a great way to save time. Just promise me that you won’t text from the car. I also use the time to listen to my Ryan Lee Insider Audio CD’s and The Strength Coach Podcast or Fitcast

7- Do brief workouts. Again, if you are busy you don’t have time to lift for two hours. I try to do 4-5 High Intensity Cardiovascular Workouts a week. These are either 12-14 minute threshold rides ( usually a five mile AirDyne for time) or a series of distances for time. My favorites are timed miles or half miles with a heartrate recovery. These workouts take a maximum of 20 minutes. In addition, I love Craig Ballantynes Bodyweight 100. It currently takes me less than 4 minutes to get a full body lift. I try to lift twice a week but, probably average one workout every five days. 

As I always say, the secret is there is no secret. Read about how to save time and to be more productive. Read The One Minute Manager. It’s a great start. Pick up little tricks. Success is really is about getting up and being organized. I personal train 10-15 hours a week, work as a college strength and conditioning coach ( BU is currently number 2 in the country) , coach Pro athletes 8 hrs a week all the while keeping up with writing, emails, strengthcoach.com and strengthcoachblog.com. I love the idea of “ready-fire-aim” approach. I would rather have done one thing than thought about three. I read another great tip but, can’t remember where. The tip was to be a 90% person. If a success oriented person strives to do 100% they rarely complete anything. The advice was the last ten percent kills you and stalls you. I don’t worry any more if every article or DVD is perfect. I want to always deliver a quality product but, I don’t obsess over it any more. Don’t over –plan or over-think, just strive to get a lot done. Make a list and start checking stuff off.

More Evidence for Late Specialization

Posted in Training, Youth Training on January 28, 2009 by mboyle1959

Current Boston Bruin and former U Minnesota hockey player Blake Wheeler had a hat trick and was MVP of the All-Star weekend Young Stars game. The following was written by Steve Conroy of the Boston Herald about Wheeler on Monday.

” For so many youth hockey players, hockey has become a year-round activity. It was not like that for Blake Wheeler who also played football and baseball at the Breck School in Minneapolis, Minn- and he feels he’s better off for it.

Said Wheeler ” For me, I think it’s the most important thing for kids growing up. You see so many of these kids just playing hockey 24/7 12 months out of the year. And for me i would have gotten really burnt out on it. It was important for me to have a balance in different sports…”

Don’t try to convince yourself that Wheeler succeeded in spite of not specializing. The evidence is overwhelming that athletes succeed because they do not specialize. If you want a great player, develop a great athlete first.

Hank’s Big Adventure

Posted in Fat Loss, Guest Authors, MBSC News, Nutrition, Training with tags on January 27, 2009 by mboyle1959

The following was printed today at my friend Hank Morses’s blog http://hanksbigadventure.blogspot.com/ . Hank is a Mike Boyle Strength and Conditioning client. He is also the inspiration for my presentation this year on the Perform Better tour.  In addition his story also played a big part in our first webinar  http://fitnesswebinars.wordpress.com/get-previous-webinars. Just wanted to share it with my readers:

 

Hi folks…..we’re almost one-twelfth of the way through the year and have you made your commitment to improving your health? Before you drop some expletives in my direction (who like’s to be questioned by a fat guy?), let me share my weekend.

 

Friday night, I deejayed a school function for my daughters, where they and their friends got up and sang on stage, danced with their friends, goofed off a lot and had a blast.

 

Saturday morning, I jumped into the frigid Atlantic at Wollaston Beach in Quincy as part of the John Hancock Birthday Plunge, to raise money for Interfaith Social Services. ISS serves needy families and individuals on the South Shore. Saturday night, I emceed an auction/fundraiser for a three month old baby girl, whose mother died during childbirth last October. You can go the website http://www.helpbabyelise.com , if you’d like to donate to her fund.

 

My point is this: Family and friends are so important, life is short and you have to take advantage of any opportunity that comes your way in life. I was fortunate that, despite my lifetime of fatness, I didn’t have any serious illnesses. I did lose a gallbladder, though. Luckily for me, Mike Boyle offered to help me lose weight and the one thing I’ve done right during the last decade was take him up on his offer and take advantage of the help he offered. I’ve lost about 105 pounds……I tip the scale at 270….and I’ve got a long way to go. My wife, my daughters, my friends….they are all very important to me. YOU are important to your family and friends. Put yourself first, for one. Spend the money on your fitness NOW….not when your relegated to some long term care facility with disabling physical limitations.

 

When I first started working out, I used to visualize skiing with my daughters, whenever I’d be struggling on the treadmill, or doubting myself. Last winter, while Abbey and Charlotte skied, I sat on my size 54s in the lodge, lamenting how I’d let myself  balloon to 375 pounds.

 

Yesterday, I skied at Wachusett Mountain in Princeton on a glorious, sunny winter day. The girls both brought a friend. The girls glided down the mountain with their friends, I wiped a tear from my eye as I got to the top of the lift, and felt like Bobby Orr soaring through the air as I made my way down the mountain to the lodge.

 

I want to thank Mike Boyle Strength and Conditioning in Winchester for helping me attain one of my many goals. If I can do it, you can too.

 

Go get ‘em……TODAY!!!!

 

Best,

Hank

Posted in Uncategorized on January 26, 2009 by mboyle1959

This week on strengthcoach.com will be a bit different. We are going to take a break from the “how to” articles and look at some other issues that we deal with day to day.

 Today we will run a piece I wrote called A Day in the Life. This is a time management article I think you will enjoy. I also think it will help your productivity.

 Next up will be another piece from Jeff Higuera called Be Greatful. Jeff is a great young coach and an excellent motivational writer. I have previously shared his work with you on the site.

 Later on in the week will have a new Video of the Week. This video expands on the Functional Training Grid idea we showed a few weeks ago.

 The last item is a new one that I know everyone will enjoy. Beginning this week we will feature a sample program each week. Our good friend Anthony Renna figured out how to screen capture files, making it much easier to post programs on the site.

 As always don’t forget to check out the StrengthCoach Podcast. Anthony has posted Episode 27.5 “The Gray Cook / Brent Jones Conference call at www.strengthcoachpodcast.com .

Last but, not least if you missed our Fat Loss Secrets Webinar you can still go to  http://fitnesswebinars.wordpress.com/get-previous-webinars .   Once you purchase it, you will be sent an email with a link and a password for viewing.”


Video of the Week- Reaching One Leg Straight Leg Deadlift

Posted in Random Thoughts, Training, Training Females, Youth Training on January 24, 2009 by mboyle1959

The video of the week this week is a variation of the One Leg Straight Leg Deadlift. I think the hip hinge action of the one leg straight leg deadlifts is one of the more difficult exercises/ techniques to teach.  Many trainees have difficulty maintaining upper back position as they forward bend and end up substituting spinal flexion for hip flexion to get range of motion. In order to prevent this we developed the concept of the Reaching One Leg Straight Leg Deadlift. The actions of reaching out with the hands and back with the foot “turn on” the entire posterior chain in an almost reflexive manner. Athletes and clients who could not conceptualize the exercise, suddenly “get it”.

However, some athletes and clients still have difficulty getting the concept of reaching. In order to encourage these clients we took the exercise one step further and had them do it into a wall. The key to the exercise is to position the client or athlete far enouh away from the wall so that they really have to extend to reach it. This may take a little tinkering but, the results are outstanding.