Who Should You Take Advice From?


Brian Carrol wrote an interesting piece called Five Reasons Your Not Getting Stronger. It was pretty good and to the point.

I thought I’d analyze this part though?

Qualify the person you’re taking advice from using these 5 questions I learned from Dave Tate of Elite FTS:

1. What is his/her education and background?
2. How is/was this coach’s performance in the particular sport they’re coaching?
3. Who have they trained?
4. Have they been able to make athletes better than they were before training with them?
5. Do they practice what they preach?

If I score myself, I do pretty good on number 1, education and background.

Number 2, performance in the particular sport they are coaching? I was not very good at anything. In fact, my best sport was swimming. I played and liked lots of other stuff ( powerlifting, basketball, football) but, performance? Not so much. Surprisingly, I have a baseball worlds series ring ( played from 8 years old to 12 and stunk) and two ice hockey national championship rings ( never played). By the way, my dad one a few state championships as a basketball coach and never played organized basketball. Also, in most team sports, great players don’t make great coaches. In strength and conditioning most of the best coaches I know either weren’t very good, had a career shortened by injury or both.

3, who have they trained? I make a big comeback here. That part of my resume is better than average.

4, have they been able to make people better athletes than before they trained them? Another positive. At MBSC we have professional athletes who started with us a middle schoolers. I think this one is huge. I hate the coaches who suck up to some All Star and then take credit for him. This is sadly very common and something we go through every day.

5, do they practice what they preach? Oops, abject failure. I have not lifted a heavy weight since the 80’s and probably do far too many 12 ounce curls ( I will occasionally go heavy at 16 and 22).

Bottom line, be careful with guru’s, Dave and John are right however I would recommend that you really focus on 1, 3, and 4. Playing the sport and looking good doesn’t make you a good coach.

One Response to “Who Should You Take Advice From?”

  1. Mike,
    Those that can, do. Those that can’t? Well, often they’re terrific teachers? The real key? Can they recognize what makes others great, and communicate that knowledge effectively?
    Thanks for the post.

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