Archive for July, 2015

Article on StrengthCoach- “The Golden Arches”- Max Prokopy

Posted in Guest Authors, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training on July 15, 2015 by mboyle1959

Sports performance coaches should always be working to enhance athletes’ best qualities while mitigating the risky parts of a profile.  It could be nutrition, work ethic, or a bum wrist.  One of the most common tendencies I see is quad- or knee-dominant gait.  Since most athletes run, this is pretty important.  I think most of us combat this tendency.  It’s a constant struggle to get the hips back into the spotlight.

The joint-by-joint approach tells us the knee should be stable.  More precisely, the knee should be mobile in the sagittal plane and stable in the frontal and transverse.  That’s pretty much what running is: control the frontal/rotational forces to safely apply power.  The knee musculature can’t do this by itself.  It needs help from above and below.  Let’s take a look at how we can connect these things for a more robust athlete.

The Hip

A good coach won’t need much convincing on the value of the glutes.  They have the best lever arm and muscle fiber type for the job.  There is a place in our world for hip isolation exercises.  I’ll simply say I prefer to teach or tune core stability first.  McGill, DNS, PRI, and a bunch of other paradigms would seem to converge on this basic concept.  Whenever experts from a bunch of different approaches tell me the same thing, I’m going to listen.

The Foot

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Development vs Winning

Posted in Guest Authors, Hockey, Media, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags on July 14, 2015 by mboyle1959

This piece could just as easy be hockey as soccer.

Development vs Winning

However in hockey you can even eliminate the one pass and just let your best player go end to end and get you goals.

However, as the game progresses you continually find kids who don’t know how to play hockey.

Think about this quote. I asked my squirt aged son ( age 10) whether he liked cross ice or full ice. His typical response FULL ICE. I asked why. His answer MORE BREAKAWAYS!

This is analogous to me asking him if he likes ice cream or salad. We know the answer. Just remember, it’s not about what a kid likes ( or a parent) it’s about what’s good for them.

We are the adults, we get to choose. When we choose winning at the young ages we actually program for failure later.

For All Youth Sports Parents- PLEASE READ

Posted in Guest Authors, Injuries, MBSC News, Media, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags on July 12, 2015 by mboyle1959

This is an absolute, must read,  classic. I see this every day in our town. You can’t buy athletic success but, you certainly can pay to get your children more screwed up. I have always told parents “follow the money”.

Early specialization is both a developmental and social mistake. Don’t get sucked in. The best preparation for young kids ( 8-13) is multi-sport participation. Save your money.

Elite at 10?

 

Lessons From Martin St. Louis

Posted in Guest Authors, Hockey, Training, Youth Training with tags , on July 11, 2015 by mboyle1959

This article came from John O’Sullivan of Changing the Game Project. I had the pleasure to meet Martin St. Louis and think his story inspires everyone but, particularly those told they were too small, too slow or, too something else to make it.

http://changingthegameproject.com/an-uncommon-man-life-lessons-from-a-true-sports-role-model/

Have You Tried Gratitude Writing?

Posted in MBSC News, Random Thoughts with tags , , on July 9, 2015 by mboyle1959

I know, you first thought is “oh my god, Mike Boyle has gone all touchy- feely on us”. This may or may not be true but, try a gratitude journal. Great way to reflect on who and what is important to you.

I tried it and loved it so much I bought journals for our entire staff. Thanks to Craig Ballantyne for the push I needed to do this.

To order a journal go to:

http://www.earlytorise.com/journal

Article on StrengthCoach.com- “Coaching Females”- Brijesh Patel

Posted in StrengthCoach.com Updates on July 8, 2015 by mboyle1959

ussoccer

The strength and conditioning field is primarily dominated by males and in many instances, these males will have to coach female athletes.  The perception of females is that they are softer, more sensitive, and not as tough as males.  If you, as a male coach, feed into these stereo types you are hurting the development of your female athletes.  I’m a big believer that you should coach your female athletes as hard as you would coach males.  There are a number of gender differences, which we will get into, but from a psychological standpoint, the expectations, standards and attention to detail shouldn’t be different.  Females are smart and will realize if you are going “soft” on them, and in my experience, they like to be pushed, motivated, and held to an extremely high standard.

Females are often reluctant to be competitive – especially amongst their teammates.  They would rather be friends and want to be liked…whereas males often have no problem being competitive and understanding where to draw the line between being a friend vs. a teammate.

NCSoccer

North Carolina Women’s Soccer Coach, Anson Dorrance, has noticed a similar situation with the women on his team:

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Can You Gain Mass With Split Squats?

Posted in Hockey, Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Uncategorized with tags on July 1, 2015 by mboyle1959

Got this question yesterday?

Q- With using split squats, RFE split squats, etc. instead of back squat or any bilateral lifts besides deadlift; can
you still put on mass successfully?

A- The answer to the question would be “why not”. Do you think the body knows how many legs it on?

One idea that is thrown around is that heavy weights produce an anabolic effect. Although this may be true, I don’t think there is any evidence that the heavy load needs to be applied bilaterally? Do you really think your hormones say “I’ll hold off here, he’s only using one leg”?

Also, hypertrophy in response to high volume bodyweight work can be seen in a number of examples. Distance runners tend to have unusually large calves. Speed skaters and cyclists tend to have large quads. Any female athlete that jumps or sprints tends to have great glute development.

The reality is that heavy loads are not a requirement for hypertrophy and, that light loads might actually work just as well.

In any case I don’t think the body knows whether each leg squatted 150 lbs or, both legs squatted 300. In fact, if we look at bilateral deficit, the average weight per limb might be heavier.

Thoughts?