Association between Lower Extremity Muscle Strength and Noncontact ACL Injuries.


This is a great example of why we need to read studies, not conclusions.

Association between Lower Extremity Muscle Strength and Noncontact ACL Injuries.

The title should have been Association Between Incredibly Outdated Strength Training Concepts and Noncontact ACL Injuries. 

The study measured peak concentric isokinetic quadriceps and hamstring torques (60°·s), hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio, isometric hip abduction strength, and one-repetition maximum in a seated leg press.

Ouch.

This was the conclusion:

“Peak lower extremity strength was not associated with an increased ACL injury risk among female elite handball and football players. Hence, peak strength, as measured in the present study, cannot be used to screen elite female athletes to predict injury risk.”

One Response to “Association between Lower Extremity Muscle Strength and Noncontact ACL Injuries.”

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