Coach Michael Boyle


Michael Boyle is one of the foremost experts in the fields of Strength and Conditioning, Functional Training and general fitness. He currently spends his time lecturing, teaching, training and writing. In 1996 Michael co founded Mike Boyle Strength and Conditioning, one of the first for-profit strength and conditioning companies in the world. Mike Boyle Strength and Conditioning exists for one reason: to provide performance enhancement training for athletes of all levels. Athletes trained range from junior high school students to All Stars in almost every major professional sport.

Prior to founding Mike Boyle Strength and Conditioning, Michael served as the Head Strength and Conditioning Coach at Boston University for 15 years. Presently Boyle continues to serve as an assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach at Boston University, primarily responsible for ice hockey. In addition to his duties at Boston University, from 1991-1999 Boyle served as the Strength and Conditioning Coach for the Boston Bruins of the National Hockey League. Michael was also the Strength and Conditioning Coach for the 1998 US Women’s Olympic Ice Hockey Team, Gold Medalists in Nagano, and served as a consultant in the development of the USA Hockey National Team Development Program in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Michael has been a featured speaker at numerous strength and conditioning and athletic training clinics across the country and has produced nine instructional videos in the area of strength and conditioning available through M-F Athletic. In addition, Michael published Functional Training for Sports for Human Kinetics Publishers.

Check out Coach Boyle at StrengthCoach.com.

10 Responses to “Coach Michael Boyle”

  1. mboyle1959 Says:

    Coach Hupprich- how are you. My email is mboyle1959@aol.com

  2. I would like to get coach mike’s e-mail. I am an old time acquaintance from Mike’s Malden football days. I just purchased his Functional Training book and would like to get in touch to give him my whole story. I am a P.E. Teacher here at Antilles School on the island of St. Thomas, USVI

  3. […] an awesome article from one of my colleagues, Michael Boyle. It's an article that can shift your perspective about your relationship with your body. Check […]

  4. mboyle1959 Says:

    In order
    1- Front squats will still develop some element of posterior chain but based on
    2- 1 leg Straight leg Deadlift would be your best choice. Not sure if that hurts or not.
    3- Yes, do less.

  5. mboyle1959 Says:

    Email me at mboyle1959@aol.com

  6. wangfengng Says:

    DearProfessor Michael Boyle
    My name is wangfeng ,I am a postgraduate staying in Beijing sport university in China ,majoying in tennis .I am very interesting in the functional training,I want to make some research about the functional training in the tennis, would you mind sending your emeil ?I want to ask you some question.
    wang feng from Beijing China

  7. hola michael, quisiera saber cuales son los movimientos chop, sacame de la duda por favor

  8. Joseph Chin Says:

    Hi Michael,

    I read your article “Strong Athlete, Zero Injuries” and find that your ideas are fantastic. I realized that many of the touted routines such as back squats and deadlifts are the cause of many injuries, some of which i have received myself. I am 23, and only 155 pounds. I hope to become stronger and have come across your name as one of the best authorities out there! I have a questions:

    1. If i replace the back squat with front squats, what can i do to developed balanced posterior strength (I only have access to dumbbells)?

    2. Is there a replacement for the single-leg/double leg deadlift in developing lowerback strength if you have a slight injury in the lower back and the movements themselves cause clicks in the hips? Are machines really that bad for you?

    3. Anyway of avoiding the occassional elbow pain on the inside and outside of elbows when doing the pullups/chins?

    Thank you,

    Joseph from New York

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