Archive for the Core training Category

Complete Core Questions

Posted in Core training, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Training with tags , , on November 16, 2017 by mboyle1959

I’ve been getting some great questions from viewers of Complete Core and, figured the best way to answer was via a blog post.

1. Recently I was in a seminar by a good physiotherapist. She told us that we can’t make the little core muscles stronger (i.e. multifidus) like the big ones (i.e. rectus abdominis, oblique). But we can make them more skillfull, so they could know when to swicth on and off. That is what she called stability. And she said it is a great way to use unstabile surfaces like big balls. For example lie on a big ball with the stomach and raise the left leg and right arm. In the “What is the core” video you seemed to don’t like the use of balls. What is your opinion on this?
A- We don’t use the stability ball much any more. I think we can do the same quadruped type exercises without the ball and, the effect will be far more “real world”. I think if you look at the quadruped section you can see that core stability ( in my opinion) is being able to move the hips or shoulders without the spine compensating. I’m not sure if the addition of the stability ball helps.
2. I think I have a good book for you. When you mentioned swimming under the pool I thought you might want to read this.
Patrick McKeown – The Oxygen Advantage
This is a revolutionary book about nose breathing and CO2 tolerance. I use this on myself and clients and have big results. Better recovery (short and long term), health and mental fitness. I think you can use this with your athletes too.
A- I’ll check it out. I think we are going to see much more interest in how we breath over the next few years. That is why I spent so much time on it. I was completely wrong about breathing and readily admit it.
3. I know that sit-ups and crunches are bad for the spine, but I didn’t know that leg raises were bad. Are leg raises, L-sit holds and hollow body holds bad for our spine or do they just not help build a better core?
 So my question is am I hurting my people with these exercises or do these exercises not help them to achieve  better core mechanics?
A- I’ll answer 3 and 4 together below as they are related. 
4. Also I think you mentioned (57:50 in the video) that we would never do hanging leg raises in a functional way. But when you climb a rope while using your legs, I think you do the a hanging leg raise. You have a high grip, then you raise your legs as high as possible, hook the rope with your legs, you “squat up” with your legs and then re-grip again higher. Also it is true that when you rope a climb like this you don’t raise your extended legs just your flexed legs.
A- I am not a fan of leg raises. As I mentioned in the video I’m not a fan of long lever hip flexion. With the exception of punters in American football, divers and gymnasts, very few people will use long lever hip flexion. I have also found that those with longer legs can get back pain from hip flexor oriented leg work. I think if your athletes climb ropes, they might need that function?
5. I would like to ask if some of the exercises I have used before are healthy or not in your opinion:
Is the Twist holds rotation of the thoracic or the lumbar spine?:

A- Absolutely lumbar. I would never do this under any circumstances. Ask yourself, why you do it?
Same question as above about the Windshield wipers?

A- Another exercise I would put in “silly, waste of time category”. Again, ask yourself “why would I do that “? 
Kettlebell windmills (if the the flexion happens in the hips and not in the lateral flexion of the spine)?

A- I like Steve but, would never do these either. I like them even less with the slam. I guess my question in every case is ” why are you doing this” and ” what do you expect to accomplish”. I think as you view the examples in the program you’ll see that we really cover why, what and how.
Check out Complete Core and see what you think?
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Questions from New Functional Training for Sports and FSC 6

Posted in Core training, Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training on January 13, 2017 by mboyle1959

I got a few questions from someone who had bought New Functional Training for Sports

NewFTFS_Coverand Functional Strength Coach 6.0fsc6webimageso, I figured, why not make it into a blog post? So, here goes.

1. What is your opinion about RFESS jumps? Can they be used to develop power?

I love rear foot elevated split squat jumps as well as explosive step ups as power exercises. We do both

2. Why do you emphasize a 5 second holds in quadruped opposite extensions and other exercises?

We use five second holds to eliminate momentum and cheating. My old friend Al Visnick ( a PT) once said “if you want to develop stabilizers, you need to give them time to stabilize”.

3. Why you do not want your athletes and clients to hold plank for longer than 30 seconds?

In a word, because it’s boring. I just can’t see any reason to do it.

4. What number exercise ratios would you suggest between anti-rotation, anti-extension and anti-lateral flexion exercises? Are there any recommended stability levels?

Ideally I’d love to have 2 of each per week. In a four day program we can generally do that. In a two day we might get one anti-extension and one anti-lateral flexion.

 

PS- if you want your questions answered every day, why not check out Strengthcoach.com ? It’s the best choice for strength and conditioning information on the internet.

Do Rear Foot Elevated Split Squats Cause Back Pain?

Posted in Core training, Injuries, Low Back Pain, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training with tags on June 10, 2016 by mboyle1959

I just got back from speaking at the Perform Better Summit in Orlando.  Before my talks I took in Stuart McGill’s talk ( he is always one of my favorites and has greatly influenced me).

Recently Dr McGill has been vocal about Rear Foot Elevated Split Squats potentially causing back pain, particularly SI joint pain and as he calls it “pelvic ring” disruption.

We probably use the rear foot elevated split squat as much as anyone and, have not had any increase in SI joint pain or back pain in general. In fact, we switched to the split squat variations in response to back pain from heavy back and front squats. ( to finish reading, click here…)

 

The Joint by Joint Approach to Training

Posted in Core training, Injuries, Low Back Pain, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Uncategorized with tags on February 2, 2016 by mboyle1959

I’m not sure when I wrote this but, I’m going to say 2007. It was originally a T-Nation piece. Others have “borrowed” from this thought process so often that many of you may have missed the original article. In the process of writing The New Functional Training for Sports I realized this would be a good “repost”.

“We get old too soon and smart too late.” Swedish Proverb My good friend, Physical Therapist Gray Cook, has a gift for simplifying complex topics. I envy his ability to succinctly take a complicated thought process and make the idea appear simple. In a recent conversation about the effect of training on the body, Cook produced one of the most lucid thought processes I have ever heard.

to finish reading A Joint by Joint Approach to Training on StrengthCoach.com, click here

7 Days to the MBSC Winter Seminar

Posted in Core training, Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Seminars, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates with tags on January 9, 2016 by mboyle1959

The MBSC Winter Seminar is only 7 days away. Have you signed up yet? I can guarantee you that Ana Hartmann’s talk will be worth the time invested all by itself.

Do you know that  being barefoot may be the key to low back health?

Have you ever thought of shoes as “sensory deprivation chambers for the feet’?

Ana’s talk was our best in-service in years and we are bringing her back to MBSC next Saturday to share her info with you. In addition, you’ll get talks from me ( 25 Mistakes, 25 Years), Kevin Carr, and Marco Sanchez as well as a great hands -on afternoon.

Sign up here http://www.bodybyboyle.com/seminar 

Do Rear Foot Elevated Split Squats Cause Back Pain?

Posted in Core training, Injuries, Low Back Pain, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females with tags , on June 30, 2015 by mboyle1959

I just got back from speaking at the Perform Better Summit in Chicago. In between my talks I took in Stuart McGill’s talk ( he is always one of my favorites and has greatly influenced me).

Recently Dr McGill has been vocal about Rear Foot Elevated Split Squats potentially causing back pain, particularly SI joint pain and as he calls it “pelvic ring” disruption.

We probably use the rear foot elevated split squat as much as anyone and, have not had any increase in SI joint pain or back pain in general. In fact, we switched to the split squat variations in response to back pain from heavy back and front squats.

My theory on why we don’t have back pain from the rear foot elevated split squat is three fold.

1- We use a relatively short stance. A lot of the videos I’ve seen have the rear leg quite extended.

2-  We rarely do more than 30 reps per week per leg. A big volume week for us would be three sets of 10.

3- We never put the bar in a back or front squat position. Positioning the bar this way causes a great deal of lumbar extension which could increase back stress and anterior hip stress. We always use dumbbells of kettle bells.

I think this “idea” is just that and has very little basis in fact. As much I’m reluctant to disagree with Dr McGill I have to one this one.

Early in the week I polled StrengthCoach.com members and couldn’t find one who thought that rear foot elevated split squats had resulted in either them or their athletes having an increase in back pain. Coincidence? I think not.

Thoughts?

MBSC Summer Program Starts Monday

Posted in Core training, Fat Loss, Hockey, Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Media, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags , on June 12, 2015 by mboyle1959

Our 18th summer program starts on Monday. It’s crazy how time flies. We still have a few spots available for late morning in both Woburn and North Andover.

PS- If you are still in school for another week you can come in the afternoon for a week or two if needed.