Archive for the Core training Category

Dr Stuart McGill on Crossfit

Posted in Core training, Guest Authors, Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Media, Training, Training Females with tags , , on May 13, 2015 by mboyle1959

Dr McGill does a pretty good analysis of Crossfit on, of all places, T-Nation

These pictures are sad.

McGill on Crossfit

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Poor Shoulder Mobility Leads to Back Pain?

Posted in Core training, Hockey, Injuries, Low Back Pain, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Uncategorized with tags on April 15, 2015 by mboyle1959

This is a follow up to a post about why we no longer squat.

“I had another epiphany the other day. Another Ah-Ha moment. Sometimes when these ideas occur I can’t decide whether I am smart or dumb. Am I smart because I had this thought or dumb because it took so long? A member of my staff and I were talking about wall slides. If you don’t know, wall slides are a great exercise borrowed from physical therapy to develop the combination of shoulder mobility and scapular stability.”

click to finish on StrengthCoach.com 

Why We Don’t Squat?

Posted in Core training, Hockey, Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Uncategorized, Youth Training with tags , , on April 14, 2015 by mboyle1959

I’ve unfortunately become famous ( or infamous) on the internet for my views on lower body training. A friend asked me if I could briefly explain my thoughts so I wrote this up. The question of why we don’t squat has both simple and complex answers. The simple reason is that we found the back squat and front squat to be the primary causes of back pain in our athletic population. At any point, in any season, approximately 20% of our athletes would be dealing some kind of back pain that was either caused by squatting or exacerbated by squatting.

The problem was finding an alternative that would allow similar loads. The answer came in three steps.

Step one was actually a picture of one of Joe DeFrancos athletes doing really heavy rear foot elevated split squats ( I think it was with 120 lb dumbbells). That picture opened up my mind to the idea that we could use really heavy loads in unilateral exercises . My first thought was “wow, that would be 480 for reps with two legs”. As a result, I reevaluated and added heavy rear foot elevated split squats to our programs.

Step two was an article by sprint coach Barry Ross. In the article Ross talked about how deadlifts required the use of more muscle mass than squats and were in truth a better total body exercise. As I sat and pondered, I had to agree. Grip work and back work were certainly a feature of the deadlift absent from the squat? I disliked deadlifts because my memories of the deadlift were the ugly ones I did in 1980’s powerlifting meets. Again as a result we added Trap Bar Deadlifts to our program.

The last step was beginning to look into the concept of bilateral deficit. The bilateral deficit research ( actually not new) supported what we saw. What we saw in the split squat was that our athletes were using proportionally heavier loads than they had used in the squat. In fact after one year we saw that our athletes split squat and front squat were equal.

As we progressed in our always experimental programming we saw the change that we desired. We had more healthy athletes. As I have always said, healthy athletes are goal 1, better athletes come second. What we found is that deadlifting gave us a bilateral, more hip dominant choice that seemed to decrease back pain while rear foot elevated split squats actually gave us both higher loads and unilateral, sport specific loads.The only thing wrong was that we were rejecting the sacred cow of squatting.

My thoughts have always been controversial but, always rooted in what was best for the athlete. Unfortunately the detractors ( haters is the popular term now) don’t want to think. They simply want to do what they have always done.

This brings me to one of my favorite quotes from Lee Cockrell in his book Creating Magic:

“What if the way we had always done it was wrong?”

Food for thought and fodder for debate.

PS- We have added front squats back with our young athletes to teach the clean catch and we do some goblet squats with beginners but, you won’t see any athletes with big loads on their shoulders in our facilities unless they are required to do that for a college test.

A Little Mike Boyle Film Festival?

Posted in Core training, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Media, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Uncategorized with tags , on January 5, 2015 by mboyle1959

Stack Magazine put together a bunch of videos we did all on one YouTube link. Take a look. Quick videos on squatting, complexes, KB swings, overhead pressing and more.

 

Our Philosophy

Posted in Core training, Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Random Thoughts, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags on December 3, 2014 by mboyle1959

I got an email the other day asking if I could provide a “philosophy” for a class. I remembered I had posted this a few years ago.

1- First we will do no harm.

As strength coaches and personal trainers our athletes and clients trust us to make decisions for them. Much like Hippocrates in early Greece we must first agree to not intentionally or unintentionally harm them.

2- We will train no further than technical failure.

There is a difference between training to failure and training to technical failure. In truth even training to technical failure may be more intensity than an athlete or client needs. However, no client needs to train beyond the point of technical failure. After technique has failed the potential for injury rises drastically. Reps done after technique has failed are simply asking for trouble. You may not trouble right away but it will find you eventually.

3- We will deliver the minimal effective dose

The minimal effective dose is a medical term but, the implication is fairly obvious. If one aspirin is needed, take just one aspirin. Don’t encourage someone to take the whole bottle. The key to delivering exercise is knowing how much is needed to create a training effect. Any more is wasted and, potentially dangerous.

As you can see, two of these concepts come from the world of medicine. I think we are the greatest medical society in the world and have more power to heal than any drug company or hospital. Unfortunately much like Superheros we must learn to use our power wisely.

Core Training in Spanish?

Posted in Core training, Guest Authors, Injuries, Low Back Pain, Seminars, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females with tags on November 26, 2014 by mboyle1959

Take a look at this

http://www.josemief.com/el-mejor-entrenamiento-de-base-del-core/

5 Exercises for Desk Jockeys

Posted in Core training, Injuries, Low Back Pain, Media on November 17, 2014 by mboyle1959

Amy Rushlow wrote a nice piece on Yahoo Sports called 5 Exercises That Combat Computer Bodies. Check it out.