Archive for the Low Back Pain Category

How Strong is Strong?

Posted in Hockey, Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Youth Training on October 23, 2015 by mboyle1959

This is one of my favorite articles…

It’s interesting, ask a strength coach what a good bench press is for a 200 lb male and chances are you’ll get a good answer. Maybe everyone won’t be in agreement but, everyone will have an opinion. Ask a good strength coach what constitutes good single leg strength or good vertical pulling strength and I don’t think you’ll get the same level of agreement or, if everyone will even have an answer. The answer might even be something like “what do you mean?” Last spring and summer I set out to answer both questions. How much single leg strength and upper back strength are actually possible? I think if you are going to train, you need a goal. If we are going to train for strength, we need to know what strong is. The four-minute mile is a great example. In 1957 Roger Bannister broke the four-minute mile. On that day he broke a twelve year old record. By the end of 1957 sixteen runners had also broken the four-minute mile. It’s amazing what someone will do once they have seen that it is possible. Twelve years to break the record and sixteen followers in one year. My goal is to raise the bar on both single leg strength and upper back strength by telling the strength and conditioning world how strong strong might be….

to read the rest click here

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Undulating Periodization and Load Selection

Posted in Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Uncategorized, Youth Training with tags on September 23, 2015 by mboyle1959

Got a great  question via email after our Certified Functional Strength Coach course in Germany

I’m trying to set up my own peridization model that works for my clients. The problem is that I have no clue at what intensity I should program things like SLDL or RFESS.

I have data for bench, deadlift, chin-up, Over-Head-Press, and Front-Squat. Which percentage of my bench max can I use for the incline dumbell bench press for example?

What about deadlift max to SLDL? So One-Leg to Two-Legs?
Are there any good % from the big“ lifts to use for those single leg Lifts?

First off, great questions I’ll try to answer one at a time. To better understand our periodization model, read this:   Variety in Strength Training

1- Bench to dumbbell incline is the easiest. You need to remember that none of these conversions are perfect but, they work well to start. When we think bilateral to dumbbells we think 80% so for dumbbell bench press take 80 your bench rep max and divide by 2.

Example  100K x 5 in the bench press would be 40K dumbbells. ( .8×100)/2

To go from bench to incline we would again take 80% so the incline number would be 32K. Does that make sense. To make it easy you can do 64% ( 8×8) and divide by two.

2- Deadlift to SLDL and squat to RFESS won’t work as well. In a trained athlete who is experienced with the unilateral lifts there will be some relationships that work but, they will never work for beginners. Our trained athletes could split squat and front squat the same weights?

Ideally RFESS and 1 Leg SLDL will be pretty much equal but, that rarely happens. I like to start with regular split squat first using bodyweight and then progressing to the goblet position and then just use a progressive resistance approach. Think 2-4 K per week.

Hope this helps.

To Clean or not to Clean, That is the Question

Posted in Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags , , on September 19, 2015 by mboyle1959

Great article from our free articles section on Why We Still Clean.

As I’ve said over and over, I love StrengthCoach.com because it supplies me with a never-ending supply of article ideas. Recently we had a forum discussion, and then an article, on performing rack pulls versus performing hang cleans as a power development exercise. Some coaches supported the idea of using rack pulls as a substitute for hang cleans; however, at Mike Boyle Strength Conditioning, we remain “clean people”. In fact, we teach all our young athletes to Olympic lift. If you are healthy you will Olympic lift in our system.

to finish click here Why We Still Clean

Can You Gain Mass With Split Squats?

Posted in Hockey, Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Uncategorized with tags on July 1, 2015 by mboyle1959

Got this question yesterday?

Q- With using split squats, RFE split squats, etc. instead of back squat or any bilateral lifts besides deadlift; can
you still put on mass successfully?

A- The answer to the question would be “why not”. Do you think the body knows how many legs it on?

One idea that is thrown around is that heavy weights produce an anabolic effect. Although this may be true, I don’t think there is any evidence that the heavy load needs to be applied bilaterally? Do you really think your hormones say “I’ll hold off here, he’s only using one leg”?

Also, hypertrophy in response to high volume bodyweight work can be seen in a number of examples. Distance runners tend to have unusually large calves. Speed skaters and cyclists tend to have large quads. Any female athlete that jumps or sprints tends to have great glute development.

The reality is that heavy loads are not a requirement for hypertrophy and, that light loads might actually work just as well.

In any case I don’t think the body knows whether each leg squatted 150 lbs or, both legs squatted 300. In fact, if we look at bilateral deficit, the average weight per limb might be heavier.

Thoughts?

Do Rear Foot Elevated Split Squats Cause Back Pain?

Posted in Core training, Injuries, Low Back Pain, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females with tags , on June 30, 2015 by mboyle1959

I just got back from speaking at the Perform Better Summit in Chicago. In between my talks I took in Stuart McGill’s talk ( he is always one of my favorites and has greatly influenced me).

Recently Dr McGill has been vocal about Rear Foot Elevated Split Squats potentially causing back pain, particularly SI joint pain and as he calls it “pelvic ring” disruption.

We probably use the rear foot elevated split squat as much as anyone and, have not had any increase in SI joint pain or back pain in general. In fact, we switched to the split squat variations in response to back pain from heavy back and front squats.

My theory on why we don’t have back pain from the rear foot elevated split squat is three fold.

1- We use a relatively short stance. A lot of the videos I’ve seen have the rear leg quite extended.

2-  We rarely do more than 30 reps per week per leg. A big volume week for us would be three sets of 10.

3- We never put the bar in a back or front squat position. Positioning the bar this way causes a great deal of lumbar extension which could increase back stress and anterior hip stress. We always use dumbbells of kettle bells.

I think this “idea” is just that and has very little basis in fact. As much I’m reluctant to disagree with Dr McGill I have to one this one.

Early in the week I polled StrengthCoach.com members and couldn’t find one who thought that rear foot elevated split squats had resulted in either them or their athletes having an increase in back pain. Coincidence? I think not.

Thoughts?

MBSC Summer Program Starts Monday

Posted in Core training, Fat Loss, Hockey, Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, Media, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags , on June 12, 2015 by mboyle1959

Our 18th summer program starts on Monday. It’s crazy how time flies. We still have a few spots available for late morning in both Woburn and North Andover.

PS- If you are still in school for another week you can come in the afternoon for a week or two if needed.

 

 

Great Piece on Foam Rolling from Thomas Myers

Posted in Guest Authors, Injuries, Low Back Pain, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training with tags on May 21, 2015 by mboyle1959

Here’s a great post from Thomas Myers of Anatomy Trains fame ( courtesy of Kevin Carr, thanks for the email). I can only say READ THIS.

Myers On Foam Rolling