Questions from New Functional Training for Sports and FSC 6

Posted in Core training, Injuries, Low Back Pain, MBSC News, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training on January 13, 2017 by mboyle1959

I got a few questions from someone who had bought New Functional Training for Sports

NewFTFS_Coverand Functional Strength Coach 6.0fsc6webimageso, I figured, why not make it into a blog post? So, here goes.

1. What is your opinion about RFESS jumps? Can they be used to develop power?

I love rear foot elevated split squat jumps as well as explosive step ups as power exercises. We do both

2. Why do you emphasize a 5 second holds in quadruped opposite extensions and other exercises?

We use five second holds to eliminate momentum and cheating. My old friend Al Visnick ( a PT) once said “if you want to develop stabilizers, you need to give them time to stabilize”.

3. Why you do not want your athletes and clients to hold plank for longer than 30 seconds?

In a word, because it’s boring. I just can’t see any reason to do it.

4. What number exercise ratios would you suggest between anti-rotation, anti-extension and anti-lateral flexion exercises? Are there any recommended stability levels?

Ideally I’d love to have 2 of each per week. In a four day program we can generally do that. In a two day we might get one anti-extension and one anti-lateral flexion.

 

PS- if you want your questions answered every day, why not check out Strengthcoach.com ? It’s the best choice for strength and conditioning information on the internet.

Karaoke vs Carioca?

Posted in MBSC News, Random Thoughts, Training, Youth Training on January 12, 2017 by mboyle1959

If I see this again, I’m going to scream.

I got an athletes warm-up that had them doing karaoke. Now, karaoke is fun but, it’s not a warm-up.

This is karaoke , really bad Tina Turner, but karaoke.

This is carioca, a lateral movement drill that is appropriate for warm-up

Please, stop confusing the two. It makes me crazy.

PS- if you want your questions answered every day, why not check out Strengthcoach.com ? It’s the best choice for strength and conditioning information on the internet.

Training the Endurance Athlete

Posted in Uncategorized on January 11, 2017 by mboyle1959

Do you work with endurance athletes? If you do, here’s an article I added to our free articles section on StrengthCoach.com on training endurance athletes.

Training the Endurance Athlete

Great Sleep Article

Posted in Uncategorized on January 5, 2017 by mboyle1959

Here’s a great article from the Mercola site on sleep

Sleep Article

What We Need is Speed

Posted in Uncategorized on January 4, 2017 by mboyle1959

I purchased this a few weeks and declared it “the best speed book since The Charlie Francis Training System”

After finishing it, I’ll say it again.

I have pages of notes and love the brilliant simplicity of the book.

Quotes like ” train as much as necessary, not as much as possible” fill the book. The short section on Speed for Team Sports is worth the price of the book.

As an added bonus, the author, Henk Kraaijenhof , has agreed to be our guest speaker at the MBSC Winter Seminar on February 25th.

To order, click the link below:

http://amzn.to/2j3O7qQ

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Association between Lower Extremity Muscle Strength and Noncontact ACL Injuries.

Posted in Uncategorized on December 3, 2016 by mboyle1959

This is a great example of why we need to read studies, not conclusions.

Association between Lower Extremity Muscle Strength and Noncontact ACL Injuries.

The title should have been Association Between Incredibly Outdated Strength Training Concepts and Noncontact ACL Injuries. 

The study measured peak concentric isokinetic quadriceps and hamstring torques (60°·s), hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio, isometric hip abduction strength, and one-repetition maximum in a seated leg press.

Ouch.

This was the conclusion:

“Peak lower extremity strength was not associated with an increased ACL injury risk among female elite handball and football players. Hence, peak strength, as measured in the present study, cannot be used to screen elite female athletes to predict injury risk.”

Nordic Leg Curls- The Question or the Answer?

Posted in Uncategorized on November 21, 2016 by mboyle1959

Soccer ( football to our European friends) has a huge problem. Hamstring strains are near epidemic levels. The NFL is not far behind.

As usual, the researchers have all the answers. Actually the answer. DO MORE NORDICS.

Ok, you might ask yourself, “what is a Nordic” and “will it actually prevent hamstring injury”?

Both are good questions so, lets answer them in order:

1- a “Nordic” is basically an eccentric hamstring exercise. Probably in the glute hamstring raise family but without equipment. ( see Mike Boyle on Glute Hams Youtube)

The truth is the Nordic Leg Curl demoed above may be more a test than an exercise or, may be the peak of a very steep pyramid of posterior chain exercise?

I think it’s a real oversimplification to say “just do these Nordic Leg Curls” and you will have healthy hamstrings. I think attempting these exercises with beginners is more of an accident waiting to happen and, not have a progression to get to “Nordics” might in fact cause some injuries.

To learn more, read this:

Mike Boyle- Dealing With Hamstring Injury

 

Unilateral Training and the Bilateral Deficit

Posted in Uncategorized on November 2, 2016 by mboyle1959

I wrote this a few weeks ago for StrengthCoach.com

Unilateral Training and the Bilateral Deficit

“What if the way we had always done it was wrong?”

Lee Cockrell- Creating Magic

Any time we bring long held beliefs into question there is bound to be controversy. However, imagine that I was going to show you a new spin on lower body strength training that would allow you to train with heavier weights and yet was far safer and potentially more effective than what you currently do? I think many intelligent coaches would at least initially say “show me”.

to finish, click here

Best Speed Book in Decades

Posted in Uncategorized on October 20, 2016 by mboyle1959

This is the best book I have read on speed since The Charlie Francis Training System. It’s rare that something like this comes out. To order, click the link below.

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https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0989619893/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0989619893&linkCode=as2&tag=michaelboyleb-20&linkId=68af314d368ee3ba5a4684feaba68a89

Amazing Review of New Functional Training for Sports

Posted in Uncategorized on October 19, 2016 by mboyle1959

This review made my day. The reviewer said that I had written ” the best book on sports training published to date”.

Here’s the entire text:

This could just be the very best book I have ever read on strength training and conditioning for sports (and fitness). Page after page, I found myself utterly impressed by Boyle’s wisdom and sensible viewpoints on virtually every topic. In an industry dominated by arrogance and bravado, Boyle’s humility and ability to recognize weaknesses in his method and to change his mind on several concepts, acts a model for all in our field.

The text is divided into 11 chapters. It’s well worth the investment of time reading every word and the book from cover to cover, as there are tips and ‘take home’ messages on every page. The book begins by a discussion on making training more functional. Here, Boyle covers the latest science on the topic and puts to bed some of the silly circus-style training that is mistakenly thought to be functional training. In this chapter, I appreciated the simplicity of his approach to strength conditioning: stability for the stabilizers, strength for the muscles involved in the sport, emphasize unilateral strength development, high emphasis on free weights, protect from injury.

The next chapter covers the analysis of the various demands of the sport. An understanding of these components allows us to see how Boyle selects the exercise, loading and programs covered later in the book.

The next chapter is about assessing functional strength. Again, I appreciated the simplicity of his approach: assessing strength in what matters – chin-ups, rows, push- ups, and split squats. Of the seemly endless battery of tests available to a trainer, Boyle cuts to the heart of the matter by simply assessing upper and unilateral lower body strength which gives the trainer clear directions as to the future exercise emphasis for their clients.

The real strength of this book lies in the next several chapters: program design, foam rollers, stretching and strength training for the lower and upper body, core, plyometrics and Olympic lifting. This is perhaps the best writings on these topics currently available anywhere. Clear explanations of why Boyle choses the exercises that he does and why he avoids other ways or exercise selections. His rationale for his progressions and regressions are ‘must reads’ for all trainers. You may not see eye to eye with every point, but you will certainly appreciate the wisdom and Boyle’s argumentation of why he recommends what he does.

The book concludes with a chapter on program design, where Boyle outlines the key program components, as he sees them, and then provides several sample strength programs (both for two, three and four day per week). The chapter finishes with some sample recommendations for sports specific conditioning.

Mike Boyle has written, in my opinion, the best book on sports training published to date. His wisdom, simplicity of approach, scientific foundations and over 30 years in the coaching game has produced the new standard in the field and a book that will remain a ‘must-read’ for a long time to come.

Reviewer: Tony Boutagy,

PhD, AEP, AES