Archive for Youth Sports Training

Read Coach by Michael Lewis

Posted in Random Thoughts, Training, Youth Training with tags , on December 26, 2014 by mboyle1959

Anyone who has read my posts on coaching, parenting, or early specialization will really enjoy Coach by Michael Lewis. Coach ( subtitled Lessons on the Game of Life) is about Lewis’s ( Moneyball, The Blind Side, Liars Poker) high school baseball coach but really is a microcosm of todays youth sports world. I’d put it on my Must Read list. At 91 pages you can finish it in an hour.

This quote from Coach Fitzgerald ( our protagonist) sums it up

“Look, he said . All this is about a false sense of self esteem. It’s now bestowed on kids at birth. It’s not earned. If I were to jump al over you today, you would be deeply offended. You would not get that I cared about you”

 

Read Coach.

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Size Matters

Posted in Guest Authors, Hockey, Injuries, MBSC News, Media, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags , on August 25, 2014 by mboyle1959

This is awesome. Watch the first video at least. Thanks to my friend Michelle Amidon.

Size Matters

The Race to Nowhere In Youth Sports

Posted in Media, Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Uncategorized, Youth Training with tags , on May 10, 2014 by mboyle1959

Lots of great stuff lately about youth sports. I have to credit my friend from USA Hockey Michelle Amidon for sending me so much stuff to share with my readers. THIS MIGHT BE THE BEST PIECE I HAVE READ. PLEASE READ IT!

http://changingthegameproject.com/the-race-to-nowhere-in-youth-sports/

A Misinformed Road To Success

Posted in Guest Authors, Hockey, MBSC News, Media, Training, Training Females, Uncategorized, Youth Training with tags , on April 11, 2014 by mboyle1959

From David Conte – Executive Vice President, Hockey Operations/ Director, Scouting. Entering 30th season with NJ Devils, 21st as team’s Director of Scouting NJ Devils, Stanley Cup 1995, 2000 & 2002.

Dave Conti – To Parents and Players

Parents and players are more interested in playing for rewards and for recognition rather than for pure joy.

When you do this, this limits chances of advancements, the very thing that parents and players seem to want,

they are precluded by a misinformed road map.

It is self-indulgent, all of this pursuit to go to Quebec to be in the supposed top tournament. What about citizenship? What about responsibility? The emphasis on winning results in players who are over-zealous and (unnaturally) aggressive. This emphasis deters skill development and enjoyment.

It starts at a young age; the play is too physical. Kids want to play with their friends and enjoy it for what it is. Look at kids in a skate board park.. There are no adults telling them what to do or evaluating them. They are uninhibited, inventive, just like when I was a kid playing pond hockey or street hockey.

We need more people with a love of the game.

Genetics play a big part in skill, but you see it evaporate in kids. Kids you see, who have ability when they are young, 8,10, 12 years of age, then it’s not there at 14 or 15. Why are kids leaving the sport at 14 or 15? There is too much emphasis on trophies.

These summer exposure tournaments are a big waste of time.

If you play in the summer it should be for fun. You have these people who run these things telling parents and players that if you do not participate that you will not gain recognition.

I will find you!

I do not go to these things. They are a waste.

People are too worried about status and jackets.

You need to do challenging drills,… that is how you get better.

Young players are lacking because too many people are telling them what to do and how to play, because of this they don’t think.

You don’t need exposure, you need to get better”.

Spring Hockey?

Posted in Guest Authors, Hockey, Injuries, MBSC News, Media, Training, Training Females, Uncategorized, Youth Training with tags , , , on April 3, 2014 by mboyle1959

I was quoted in this post from USA Hockey yesterday. I know we have mentioned this numerous times but, it bears repeating.

“The end of the hockey season can be a sad time for the hockey community. Even as the weather gets warmer and the days a little longer, the idea of less time at the rink is difficult for everyone.

But the changing seasons are a major opportunity for parents. Between the ages of 10 and 12, kids shouldn’t identify themselves as one-sport athletes. Looking for different opportunities to develop new skills and play a different game can be a great way to avoid the type of burnout that prevents a boy or girl from enjoying hockey later in life.

Even if a boy or girl loves to play the game, a few months spent focusing on a different sport is incredibly beneficial….”

to read the entire article, click below.

http://www.admkids.com/news_article/show/370248?referrer_id=940598

Why Do We Obsess About 9 Year Old Sports

Posted in Guest Authors, Hockey, Injuries, Media, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Youth Training with tags on February 5, 2014 by mboyle1959

If nine year old hockey or basketball has got you down read this. Remember, sports success is more of a marathon than a sprint and those in the early lead often fall back into the pack or disappear completely.

The Surprising Story of Simon Kjaer

http://changingthegameproject.com/the-surprising-story-of-simon-kjaer-why-talent-selection-does-not-always-work/

Small Sided Games are Great Practice

Posted in Strength Coach Podcast, StrengthCoach.com Updates, Training, Training Females, Uncategorized, Youth Training with tags , , , on December 18, 2012 by mboyle1959

I tweeted this two days ago

“playing lots of games without practicing is like taking lots of tests without studying.”

This led to a Facebook discussion about practice quality. As adults we think that practice must be boring and repetitive and at times it must, but for kids, small sided games ( think 3 on 3) may be the best practice ever. Check out these stats.

Dr Rick Fernoglio, a lecturer in Exercise Science at Manchester Metropolitan University, compared the experience of young soccer players during eight-a-side games and SSGs (4v4).

He found that the players in 4v4:

  • Made 135% more passes.
  • Took 260% more shots.
  • Scored 500% more goals.
  • Experienced 225% more 1v1s.
  • Did 280% more tricks, turns, and moves.

(published in Success in Soccer, March 2004)

Remember these numbers the next time you’re tempted to allow a “mass scrimmage” at the end of one of your coaching sessions.

Here’s more support for small games. Many of you reading need to think hockey when you watch. I can’t believe we are still debating cross ice Buzzer hockey. It was the best thing my son has ever done. Parents should have no input. They have no idea what they are talking about when they want 7-8 year olds playing fullice.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dPJltFaZYEc&feature=player_embedded&utm_source=The+Ontario+Soccer+Association&utm_campaign=65146e9cd6-New+LTPD+video+and+presentations+now+available&utm_medium=email